Gender pay gap report 2017-18

It matters to us!

PCH is committed to being a great place to work and our people are one of the three foundations of this forward looking organisation – along with Pounds and Place. And our commitment is recognised; we have gained Investors In People Silver, then Gold and, recently, National IIP Finalists in the Not for Profit sector. But it doesn’t stop there. We have earned Gold Accreditation for our Equality and Diversity practices and are a Disability Confident Employer as well as offering award winning Learning and Development programs.

Gender Pay at PCH

We are a social organisation and strive to build a team which is representative of the communities and customers we serve. Our initial Gender Pay results are good but clearly there is more to be done and we are on to it!

Our overall Mean Pay Gap is only 0.6% which compares well with the Office of National statistics 2017 average of 18.4%. This tiny gap reflects our agreed pay policy of basing salaries on independently determined median market benchmarks, regardless of gender. It is therefore great to see that our policy has achieved such an amazingly low gap.

Our Median pay gap is also an encouraging 5.8% which holds up well against some of the big national / international organisations. But we are not complacent!

In terms of the gender distribution at PCH we can see that women are well represented in the top salary quartile with them occupying key senior management positions across the organisation. We also run counter to national trends by having a low female intake into the lower quartile roles. Our middle quartile salary roles do show a more traditional picture with more women in the Q3 administrative jobs and more males in the Q2 technical and building related occupations.

Quartile distribution

Proportion of Male & Female in Each Quartile   

Male %

Female%

Q1 Top Quartile

38.1

61.9

Q2 Upper Middle Quartile

76.7

23.3

Q3 Lower Middle Quartile

39.7

60.3

Q4 Lower Quartile

64.4

35.6

This year’s figures capture the remaining few weeks of a productivity incentive scheme which has now been withdrawn. This was largely, but not exclusively, paid to male building trades and factory operatives. On the face of it the figures suggest a large Bonus Gap but is important to understand that the bonus payments started at a much lower point than the salaries of the other staff, at 75% of benchmark so not as bad as it looks – and our overall mean figure confirms this. This gap will not appear in our 2018 figures.

So, what are we doing?

Our strategy going forward will help us to build on our great beginnings and underpin our continuing commitment to equality and diversity in all its forms. For gender pay this includes:

  • Continually monitoring data and interpreting what it shows us
  • Creating opportunities for females to move into non-traditional roles through our internal secondment and transfer program.
  • Supporting this through our Learning and development program
  • A fair and transparent recruitment and selection process.
  • Ensuring that we advertise in a wide range of media
  • Using positive gender neutral role imagery in our advertising and employee literature.
  • Encouraging females to consider a wider range of roles within PCH by positively promoting opportunities at careers fairs and through our work supporting local schools and colleges.
  • Promoting our apprenticeships to young people of both genders.
  • Continuing our pay policy based on equality including our long standing focus on low pay.

And finally...

This is a strategy for the long term.  Committed as we are, this will be a long road to achieving lasting change and will not be straightforward. For example, recruiting additional female apprentices into entry level technical roles could actually depress our mean pay gap for a time. But I and our Board are determined to maximise our potential as a diverse and inclusive organisation.

John Clark
CEO